The Dezeen Awards 2019: These are the biggest design trends of the moment

15th Aug 19 | Lifestyle

Whether it’s fortress-like architecture or candy-coloured interiors, there’s something for everyone.

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The longlists for the Dezeen Awards 2019 have been revealed, covering the best work in architecture and design from the past year.

A massive 4,500 initial entries were narrowed to 903 projects, and by September 2 this will be whittled down to 36. On October 30 the winners will be revealed.

The Dezeen Awards are a brilliant insight into what’s going on in the world of architecture and design – and here are some of the key trends the judges have picked out…

Cork

Corkscrew House, Berlin, Germany, by Rundzwei Architekten
Corkscrew House, Berlin, Germany, by Rundzwei Architekten (Dezeen/PA)

Lightweight and seemingly insubstantial, most of us only really use cork to stopper our wine bottles. And yet it’s becoming widely used in the world of design because it’s light, as well as being insulating and fireproof.

Architect Rundzwei Architekten combined cork with another trend, sustainability, to create Berlin’s Corkscrew House which uses waste cork from the wine industry.

Cork House, Windsor, UK by Matthew Barnett Howland with Dido Milne and Oliver Wilton
Cork House, Windsor, UK by Matthew Barnett Howland with Dido Milne and Oliver Wilton (Dezeen/PA)

Another cork-based structure on the longlist this year is Cork House – created by Matthew Barnett Howland, Dido Milne and Oliver Wilton – it’s the first full-scale building to use the material as its structure. The Berkshire house next to the Thames also has sustainability in mind, using cork from forestry waste and with a design that can be easily taken down, reused or recycled.

Fortresses

Affordable Housing for the Baechi Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland, by Gus Wüstemann
Affordable Housing for the Baechi Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland, by Gus Wüstemann (Dezeen/PA)

If you’re the kind of person who wants your house to look as forbidding as possible, no doubt you’ll like a lot of the structures on the longlist. Some of these nominations are dark, almost brutalist – like an impenetrable oasis from the rest of the world.

Just take the Zurich housing block by Gus Wüstemann, made almost entirely out of concrete, with smooth sides and angular edges.

Cloister House (Enclosed House), Cambridge, Australia, by MORQ
Cloister House (Enclosed House), Cambridge, Australia, by MORQ (Dezeen/PA)

Or the MORQ-built windowless house in Perth, Australia, which is a quiet retreat on a busy road, made of rammed concrete and with a hidden courtyard full of plants.

Nature

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Lindesnes, Norway, by Snøhetta
Europe’s first underwater restaurant, Lindesnes, Norway, by Snøhetta (Dezeen/PA)

Incorporating nature into design isn’t exactly a new trend, but the Dezeen longlist is certainly doing so in innovative ways.

Particularly striking is Snøhetta’s restaurant called Under. The building is set off the craggy Norwegian coastline, half submerged underwater and half peeping up. It’s Europe’s first underwater restaurant and will also be used for marine research. Guests have a panoramic view of the North Sea, and the building itself is a large concrete tube descending into the waves.

If you wanted to be even closer to nature, look no further than Planter Box House in Kuala Lumpur. It’s made out of concrete boxes which are significantly softened by the addition of over 40 types of edible plants cascading over the building’s facade. As with many buildings on the longlist, it emphasises sustainable living.

Candy colours

Glossier Flagship, New York, USA by Gachot Studios
Glossier Flagship, New York, USA by Gachot Studios (Dezeen/PA)

Fortress-like designs don’t suit everyone, which is probably why the trend for candy-coloured interiors has emerged as an antidote. It’s a look plucked straight off Instagram – so it’s no surprise beauty brand Glossier’s New York offices makes the list. Designed by architect Rafael de Cárdenas, it is basically the IRL version of the brand’s Insta: pale pink everything.

Humble Pizza Cafe, London, UK, by Child Studio
Humble Pizza Cafe, London, UK, by Child Studio (Dezeen/PA)

Candy pink also features heavily in the design of London’s vegan spot Humble Pizza. Design firm Child Studio was inspired by 1950s cafes for the interior of the restaurant, which has a retro vibe that feels straight off of a movie set.

Cabins

Trailer, Bath, UK, by Invisible Studio
Trailer, Bath, UK, by Invisible Studio (Dezeen/PA)

A growing urge to unplug from technology and get away from it all has really bolstered this trend for remote cabins – beautiful micro-structures often set in the world’s most beautiful and isolated areas.

Take this Bath-based cabin set in the woods, which was built by Invisible Studio for £20,000.

Hammerfest Cabin, Oslo, Norway, by Kebony
Hammerfest Cabin, Oslo, Norway, by Kebony (Dezeen/PA)

We also particularly like the wooden hiking cabin called Varden, found on the Norwegian mountain Storfjellet. With incredible views, the sweet honeycomb structure provides perfect shelter for hikers passing by.

© Press Association 2019

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